Evaluating Your Snoring

It is virtually impossible to know for sure if you have sleep apnea without undergoing a sleep study. However, the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) may help. It was developed at the Sleep Disorders Unit at Epworth Hospital in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. According to clinical research published in Sleep, the journal of the American Sleep Disorders Association, it has proven to be very accurate in determining whether or not a snoring person also suffers from the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS -- see our section About Snoring and Sleep Apnea).

The ESS, takes only a few minutes to self-administer. Each of the eight situations is scored from 0 to 3 according to the simple directions. The total of these figures is the final score. According to the article, snorers who show no clinically significant obstructive sleep apnea had an average score of 6.5. Patients with OSAS scored an average of 11.7 on the ESS.

As researcher Murray W. Jones writes: "The finding that ESS scores can distinguish patients who simply snore from those with even mild OSAS is evidence for the sensitivity of the ESS. . . . Previous investigations of this kind have tended to blur the distinction between primary snoring and OSAS."

The ESS should only be considered a subjective tool in evaluating your sleepiness. If you score 11 or more, there is a good chance you may have OSAS and you should seek the advice of your physician. However, the ESS cannot diagnose your condition and scoring less than 11 does NOT guarantee you do not have OSAS. If you feel you have any signs of OSAS, you should consult your physician.

Use a pencil to write down your answers and to total your score! Take The Test Here!

Material in this section from: Johns MW. A new method for measuring daytime sleepiness: the Epworth sleepiness scale. Sleep, 14(6):540-545

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires that the TheraSnore® and all other anti-snoring appliances be fit by a physician or dentist. Patients may not fit themselves.
...providing safe sleep since 1987

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires that the TheraSnore® and all other anti-snoring appliances be fit by a physician or dentist. Patients may not fit themselves.

Disclaimer: The information provided by distar.com is not intended to be medical advice. If you suspect you have a sleep disorder you should seek care from a qualified professional. Distar is not responsible for any mistakes or omissions on the distar.com site.